Difference between revisions of "104.7 Scoping Estimates"

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m (updated link to STIP)
(Per Bidding and Estimates, estimating guidance updated to add optional spreadsheets to assist the districts with scoping and estimating processes. The Resurfacing Per Mile Scoping Form and the Project Scoping Form were made available.)
 
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Estimates based on cost per mile shall in no case be considered to contain sufficient detail to allow their inclusion in the STIP.
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The scoping estimate is used to determine solutions for a project.  There may be multiple scoping estimates for a project since there are multiple solutions for a project.  The district determines which solution best fits the purpose and need of the project and begins preliminary plans stage during which the [[121.7 Program Estimates|Program Estimate]] is complete.  The Program Estimate shall not use the cost per mile pricing because there are too many unknowns and assumptions made during the scoping stage of a project to produce an accurate Program Estimate.  The Program Estimate shall be at the preliminary plans stage after 30% of the plans are completed.
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|'''Related Information'''
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|'''Resources'''
 
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|[http://www.modot.org/plansandprojects/construction_program/STIP2017-2021/index.htm MoDOT's STIP website]
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|[[media:Fig 104.7.docx|Cost Estimate Guide for Scoping]]  
 
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|'''Figures'''
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|[[media:121.7 Project Scoping Form.xlsx|Project Scoping Form]]
 
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|[http://sharepoint/systemdelivery/TP/stwideprogs/STIPref/Documents/EngrFactors13to15.pdf Engineering Factors Report]
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|[[media:104.7 Resurfacing.xlsx|Resurfacing Per Mile Scoping Form]]  
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|[[media:Fig 104.7 2015.doc|Cost Estimate Guide for rural preliminary design]]  
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The [[media:121.7 Project Scoping Form.xlsx|Project Scoping Form]] is available for detailed documentation of various project design elements of the project in order to assist the project estimator in covering all applicable project elements while establishing the conceptual estimate. Although not required, the Project Scoping Form can be used to establish a detailed project overview of all likely applicable costs, and while the tool itself does not yield an estimate, it does serve to clearly define and document the various project elements which combine to impact the project cost. This documentation will be beneficial as the project moves forward into preliminary design and programming.
  
Project scoping estimates based on cost per mile factors shall in no case be considered to contain sufficient detail to allow their inclusion in the STIP.  The [[media:Fig 104.7 2015.doc|Cost Estimate Guide for rural preliminary design]] includes cost per mile factors derived from similar projects as well as the generic factorsIn addition, estimates of right of way costs based on generic land values will not be considered to provide the level of confidence that MoDOT requires to make STIP commitments.
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For preventative maintenance treatments, the [[media:104.7 Resurfacing.xlsx|Resurfacing Per Mile Scoping Form]] spreadsheet has basic inputs for average unit prices and the applicable work types. The spreadsheet generates a per mile cost for most resurfacing projects based upon the intended project elements to be includedWhen combined with BidTabs.net, this tool allows the user to quickly compare alternative treatments with costs based upon the specific unit costs for the project specific area.  By comparing the specific costs for each alternative, the project staff can select the best overall treatment in terms of cost and benefits for each project.
  
The best type of estimate that can be produced at this stage of [[:Category:138 Project Development Chronology|project development]] is a historic-based estimate.  Based on the quantities calculated from the preliminary plans and historical data from previous bid openings, a fairly accurate estimate can be produced.  The methodology of this type of estimate is the same as that used to produce the Engineer’s Estimate described in [[103.1 Bid Opening and Award Process#103.1.8 Engineer's Estimate|EPG 103.1.8 Engineer's Estimate]].
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The cost per mile assumption used to develop the scoping estimate should be derived using data from similar, recently-awarded, projects in the region.
  
While the scoping estimate is only based on preliminary quantities, the preliminary plans should provide enough detail to allow a fairly accurate estimate of the major project quantities.  Generally, 80% of the cost of a project will be included in the 20% of the [http://www.modot.mo.gov/business/contractor_resources/biditemslisting.htm pay items] that comprise the major items included in the project.  Most typically these items will consist of the grading, drainage and paving quantities.
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Where similar projects are not found, the Cost Estimate Guide for Scoping may be usedThe [[media:Fig 104.7.docx|Cost Estimate Guide for Scoping]] includes cost per mile factors derived from similar projects as well as the generic factors. These factors typically are for the major items of work and do not include other anticipated work that would be required to construct the project.  All other anticipated construction costs should be included in the scoping estimate which is typically assumed at 20% but may be more or less depending on the project.
 
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Tentative right of way lines included on preliminary plans will provide a reasonable estimate of the easements and right of way required for each project.  These can then be combined with an estimated amount for each property to arrive at a fairly accurate right of way estimate.
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By their nature some projects are not as complex as others and the determination of accurate cost estimates and schedules does not require the same level of effort to reach an acceptable level of project detail.  These less complex projects typically also have a much smaller budget and overall project development timeline.  In fact, the need may not be identified and delivered to the project manager until the anticipated construction year is within the first few years of the STIP.  For these projects it will be acceptable to include a cost adjustment factor with the estimates to compensate for the unknown factors that may not be identified as a result of the short amount of time provided to scope the projectTypical examples of this type of project are minor resurfacing, contracted maintenance, or level course projects.  Most projects will not fall into this category.
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[[image:104.7 Estimates.jpg|left|575px]]
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|'''Historic Engineering Factors Reports'''
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|[[media:104.7 Engineering Factors Report 06 to 08.pdf|CY 2006 - 2008]]
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|[[media:104.7 Engineering Factors Report 07 to 09.pdf|CY 2007 - 2009]]
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|[[media:104.7 Engineering Factors Report 08 to 10.pdf|FY 2008 - 2010]]
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|[[media:104.7 Engineering Factors Report 10 to 12.pdf|FY 2010 - 2012]]
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|[[media:104.7 Engineering Factors Report 11 to 13.pdf|FY 2011 - 2013]]
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|[[media:104.7 Engineering Factors Report 12 to 14a.pdf|FY 2012 - 2014]]
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|[[media:104.7 Engineering Factors Report 13 to 15.pdf|FY 2013 - 2015]]
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The majority of projects are more complex, typically include a much larger budget, and require a greater level of effort to achieve accurate estimates of cost and schedules.  For these projects the inclusion of a cost adjustment factor is not an acceptable substitute for completing all the steps of the project scoping process necessary to properly define the parameters of the project.
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All other anticipated right of way and construction costs should also be included in the project estimate.  These may include Heritage and Homestead Valuation adjustment costs for large utility relocations, incentive/disincentive clauses, contract acceleration clauses, major environmental mitigation costs, etc.  The [http://sharepoint/systemdelivery/TP/stwideprogs/STIPref/Documents/EngrFactors12to14.pdf Engineering Factors Report] is a useful document to help calculate a project's future engineering costs such as preliminary and construction engineering and right of way incidentals.  The report is updated annually.
 
  
 
[[category:104_Scope|104.07]]
 
[[category:104_Scope|104.07]]

Latest revision as of 10:25, 21 October 2019

104.7 Cost.jpg

Estimates based on cost per mile shall in no case be considered to contain sufficient detail to allow their inclusion in the STIP.

The scoping estimate is used to determine solutions for a project. There may be multiple scoping estimates for a project since there are multiple solutions for a project. The district determines which solution best fits the purpose and need of the project and begins preliminary plans stage during which the Program Estimate is complete. The Program Estimate shall not use the cost per mile pricing because there are too many unknowns and assumptions made during the scoping stage of a project to produce an accurate Program Estimate. The Program Estimate shall be at the preliminary plans stage after 30% of the plans are completed.

Resources
Cost Estimate Guide for Scoping
Project Scoping Form
Resurfacing Per Mile Scoping Form

The Project Scoping Form is available for detailed documentation of various project design elements of the project in order to assist the project estimator in covering all applicable project elements while establishing the conceptual estimate. Although not required, the Project Scoping Form can be used to establish a detailed project overview of all likely applicable costs, and while the tool itself does not yield an estimate, it does serve to clearly define and document the various project elements which combine to impact the project cost. This documentation will be beneficial as the project moves forward into preliminary design and programming.

For preventative maintenance treatments, the Resurfacing Per Mile Scoping Form spreadsheet has basic inputs for average unit prices and the applicable work types. The spreadsheet generates a per mile cost for most resurfacing projects based upon the intended project elements to be included. When combined with BidTabs.net, this tool allows the user to quickly compare alternative treatments with costs based upon the specific unit costs for the project specific area. By comparing the specific costs for each alternative, the project staff can select the best overall treatment in terms of cost and benefits for each project.

The cost per mile assumption used to develop the scoping estimate should be derived using data from similar, recently-awarded, projects in the region.

Where similar projects are not found, the Cost Estimate Guide for Scoping may be used. The Cost Estimate Guide for Scoping includes cost per mile factors derived from similar projects as well as the generic factors. These factors typically are for the major items of work and do not include other anticipated work that would be required to construct the project. All other anticipated construction costs should be included in the scoping estimate which is typically assumed at 20% but may be more or less depending on the project.