Difference between revisions of "121.5 Asset Management"

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MoDOT’s asset management plan is a rolling 10-year strategic framework for making cost-effective decisions about allocating resources and managing road and bridge system infrastructure. It is based on a process of monitoring the physical condition of assets, predicting deterioration over time and providing information on how to invest in order to meet asset management goals.  
  
Total Point Value (TPV) represents the maximum point value for a given factor. The Total Points awarded for the factor cannot be negative and cannot be more than the
+
MoDOT’s Asset Management Plan (AMP) is a crucial element in achieving MoDOT’s strategic goal of keeping roads and bridges in good condition. The AMP ensures MoDOT is using taxpayer money wisely by:
TPV.  These limits are implied in the formulas that follow even if not expressly written.
+
:* Minimizing life cycle costs,
 +
:* Maximizing system performance,
 +
:* Supporting an objective decision making process, and
 +
:* Balancing public expectations with limited funding to create a sustainable plan.
  
===121.5.1 Crash Rate===
+
'''Purpose'''
  
The Crash Rate (CR) can either be segment-based (rate per Hundred Million Vehicle Miles traveled) or intersection-based (rate per Million Entering Vehicles). The Statewide Crash Rate (SWCR) is the average crash rate for similar routes/intersections throughout the state. The score for the crash rate is based on the ratio of the project segment’s Crash Rate (CR) over the Statewide Crash Rate (SWCR).
+
MoDOT has adopted a transportation asset management approach to make the best decisions with transportation investments, by allowing decision makers to see how their investment decisions today will affect the system in the future. The purpose of the AMP is to keep roads and bridges in good condition for as long as possible given current funding levels. The plan also clearly demonstrates the investment level needed in order to maintain the system at its current condition and is a transparent way to communicate the funding needs for the system.
{|style="padding: 0.3em; margin-left:1px; border:2px solid #a9a9a9; text-align:center; font-size: 95%; background:#f5f5f5" width="160px" align="right"
 
|-
 
|'''Additional Information'''
 
|-
 
|[[:Category:128 Conceptual Studies#128.5 Crash Rate Calculation|Segment Crash Rate and Intersection Crash Rate Calculations]]
 
|}
 
'''Data:'''
 
CR = Crash Rate of roadway segment or intersection
 
 
 
SWCR = Statewide Crash Rate of similar segments or intersections
 
 
 
'''Formula:'''
 
 
 
:Total Points = TPV × ( CR / SWCR – 1 )
 
{|style="padding: 0.3em; margin-left:15px; border:1px solid #a9a9a9; text-align:center; font-size: 95%; background:#ffddcc" width="210px" align="right"
 
|-
 
|'''Intermodal Connections, Port Access'''
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/UnNumbrd/RDT02005.pdf Report 2002]
 
|-
 
|'''Pavement Smoothness and Fuel Efficiency'''
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/Ri05040/ss06003.pdf Summary 2006]
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/Ri05040/ss09002.pdf Summary 2008]
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/Ri05040/or07005.pdf Report Report 2006]
 
|-
 
|'''Pavement Smoothness Measures'''
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/Ri06003/or06017.pdf Report 2006]
 
|-
 
|'''See also:''' [http://www.modot.gov/services/OR/byDate.htm Innovation Library]
 
|}
 
 
 
===121.5.2 Crash Severity===
 
 
 
Crash Severity is based upon the number and severity of crashes and expressed through the Severity Ratio. The Equivalent Property Damage Only (EPDO) calculation shall be based upon the following factors:
 
 
 
'''Data:'''
 
EPDO = Equivalent Property Damage Only Crashes
 
 
 
TNC = Total Number of Crashes
 
 
 
SR = Severity Ratio
 
 
 
'''Formula:'''
 
 
 
EPDO = 9 × Fatal Crashes + 6 × Disabling Injury Crashes + 2 × Minor Injury Crashes + 1.0 × Property Damage Only Crashes
 
 
 
SR = EPDO / TNC
 
 
 
Total Points = TPV × (SR – 1)
 
 
 
'''The Severity Number''' calculation is similar to the EPDO calculation, but focuses only on severe crashes. 
 
 
 
'''The Severity Number Formula:'''
 
 
 
:Severity Number = 9 × Fatal Crashes + 6 × Disabling Injury Crashes
 
 
 
===121.5.3 Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)===
 
 
 
See [[121.5 Prioritization Factors#121.5.9 Daily Usage (DU)|Daily Usage]]
 
[[image:121.5.4 Bridge condition.jpg|left|215px]]
 
===121.5.4 Bridge Condition===
 
 
 
Every bridge has three condition ratings: one for the bridge deck, one for the substructure and one for the superstructure. The deck bridge condition rates the overall condition of the bridge deck on a scale of 1 through 9, with 1 being the worst condition and 9 being the best condition. The substructure bridge condition rates the physical condition of piers, abutments, piles, fenders, footings and other components using the same scale. The superstructure bridge condition rates the condition of structural members, also using the same 1 through 9 scale.
 
 
 
Bridge Condition is scored using a composite of the worst bridge condition rating of the three types (deck, substructure or superstructure) and an average of the remaining two bridge condition ratings.
 
 
 
'''Data:'''
 
BCD = Deck Condition Rating
 
 
 
BCSUB = Substructure Condition Rating
 
 
 
BCSUPER = Superstructure Condition Rating
 
 
 
'''Formula:'''
 
 
 
BCLOW = Minimum ( BCD, BCSUB, BCSUPER ) { Worst condition rating }
 
  
BCAVG = ( BCD + BCSUB + BCSUPER – BCLOW ) ÷ 2 { Average of the two BEST ratings }
+
'''Background'''
  
:1st Points = 0 ≤ ( 6 – BCLOW ) ÷ 3 × ½ × TPV ≤ ½ × TPV
+
MoDOT’s current asset management strategies have been in place since 2005. In 2016, MoDOT’s asset management planning evolved from a statewide plan to individual district models. Since 2016, each of MoDOT’s seven districts maintain an asset management plan for pavements and bridges. These plans have been developed and updated annually by multi-disciplinary teams including bridge, pavement, mobility and maintenance experts along with input from senior leadership, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and regional planning partners.
  
:2nd Points = 0 ≤ (6 – BCAVG ) ÷ 3 × ½ × TPV ≤ ½ × TPV
+
'''Goals and Objectives'''
  
Total Points = 1st Points + 2nd Points
+
The department’s asset management plan has been designed to align with MoDOT’s Tangible Results and with Missouri’s Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP).  The current and past LRTPs had extensive citizen outreach and consistently produced a number one goal of taking care of the system.  Missourians continue to place the highest priorities on structurally sound bridges and smooth roads, as does the AMP.  The AMP objective is keep the state’s transportation assets in a good condition over the life cycle of those assets at the most practical cost.  Based on current funding constriants, the goal of the AMP is to maintain exisiting pavement and bridge conditions.
  
'''Examples:'''
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==121.5.1 Asset Inventory and Condition==
  
Bridge 1: Regional and Emerging Needs Project
+
Missouri’s state highway system includes over 33,000 centerline miles of roads and more than 10,000 bridges. The system is divided into four roadway categories, each of which has its own unique characteristics regarding size, condition and use:
  
Deck Condition = 3, Superstructure Condition = 4, Substructure Condition = 5
+
:1) Interstates
:BCLOW = BCD = 3
+
:2) [[media:144 Major Highway System.pdf|Major routes]]
 +
:3) Minor routes
 +
:4) Low volume routes (fewer than 400 vehicles per day).
  
:BCAVG = ½ × ( BCSUB + BCSUPER ) = [(5+4)/2] = 4.5
+
===121.5.1.1 Pavements===
  
:1st Points = ( 6 – 3 ) / 3 × ½ × TPV = ½ × TPV
+
====121.5.1.1.1 Pavements Overview====
 +
[[media:144 Major Highway System.pdf|Major routes]] in Missouri include interstate routes and other major routes and consist of over 5,500 miles and these routes carry the majority of the travel in state. All Major Routes are included in the AMP.  For current condition and cost to maintain these routes see [[media:121.5.1.1.1 current.pdf|Current Asset Management Plan Summary]].
  
:2nd Points = ( 6 – 4.5 ) / 3 × ½ × TPV = ¼ × TPV
+
[[image:121.5.1.1.1 major.jpg|center|500px]]
 +
<center>'''Major Routes'''</center>
 +
 +
Minor Routes in Missouri consist of over half of the miles on state system and these routes carry approximately one-fourth of the travel in state. All Minor Routes are included in the AMP.  For current condition and cost to maintain these routes see [[media:121.5.1.1.1 current.pdf|Current Asset Management Plan Summary]].
  
:PV = 40 (for example)
+
[[image:121.5.1.1.1 minor.jpg|center|500px]]
 +
<center>'''Minor Routes'''</center>
 +
 +
Low Volume Routes in Missouri include routes with fewer than 400 vehicles per day travelling on them.  Low volume routes consist of approximately 1/3 of the miles on the state system and these routes carry a very small percentage of the travel in state. Low Volume Routes are not included in the AMP and are maintained by MoDOT Maintenance forces.  For current condition and cost to maintain these routes see [[media:121.5.1.1.1 current.pdf|Current Asset Management Plan Summary]].
  
Total Points = ½ × 40 + ¼ × 40 = 30
+
[[image:121.5.1.1.1 low.jpg|center|500px]]
 +
<center>'''Low Volume Routes'''</center>
  
===121.5.5 Bridge Width===
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====121.5.1.1.2 Pavement Data Collection and Analysis====
 +
[[image:121.5.1.1.2 aran.jpg|350px|right]]
 +
MoDOT administers a transportation management system (TMS) to store pavement and bridge asset data, which includes a location referencing system, condition data and videos. Pavement data for all state owned routes are collected annually. MoDOT uses an Automatic Road Analyzer (ARAN) vehicle (photo below) to collect the pavement condition data and video of each route. This information is critical to managing MoDOT’s pavement and bridge assets.
  
See [[121.5 Prioritization Factors#121.5.30 Substandard Bridge Features|Substandard Bridge Features]].
+
TMS applications capture and store all historical pavement data. MoDOT pavement experts then query this historical information and analyze the data using spreadsheets to determine how well the pavement has performed and to establish future pavement deterioration rates for pavement sections.
  
===121.5.6 Compliance with Regional or Local Land-Use Plan===
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The pavement planning tool within TMS (as shown below) has the ability to indicate pavement sections that need attention by year.  These identified pavement sections are then further analyzed by MoDOT pavement engineers to determine right treatment for the condition. These pavement sections are then considered for programming in the five-year [[121.3 The Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP)|Statewide Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP)]].
 +
[[image:121.5.1.1.2 pavement.jpg|600px|center]]
 +
 +
MoDOT has historically analyzed pavement data and tracked progress of pavement by smoothness.  Smoothness is measured by international roughness index (IRI), the lower the IRI, the smoother the road.  Shown below are the MoDOT rating categories for pavement smoothness:
  
[http://epg.modot.org/files/b/b4/121.1_RPC_MPO_2017.pdf Regional Planning Commissions (RPCs) and Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs)] will be responsible for identifying relevant land-use plans (comprehensive or master plans) for a project area, and will also be responsible for determining whether or not the project complies with the plan(s). Projects in areas that do not have an adopted land use plan do not score points for this factor.
+
<center>'''Pavement Smoothness Condition Categories'''
  
In the event that multiple land-use plans are applicable to a project, the project must be in compliance with the plan(s) that cover the majority of the project area.
+
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto" style="text-align:center"
 
 
'''Scoring:'''  Does the project comply with regional or local land use plans? If “yes,” then award TPV.  If “no,” then award zero points.
 
 
 
===121.5.7 Compliance with Regional or Local Transportation Plans===
 
[[image:121.5.7 Regional and Local.jpg|left|250px|thumb|<center>'''Cities and counties also address transportation in their own comprehensive plans'''</center>]]
 
[http://www.modot.org/plansandprojects/long-range_plan/documents/Newcontactmap.pdf Regional Planning Commissions (RPCs) and Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs)] will be responsible for determining whether a functional transportation need is identified in their long-range transportation plan and whether addressing that need is in compliance with the plan.
 
 
 
In Metropolitan Planning Organization areas, no project utilizing Federal funds may be programmed unless the project complies with the MPO long-range transportation plan. This requirement is mandated by Federal law and applies to all types of projects. It is also assumed that, in general, MoDOT will not be programming projects that are not in compliance with the RPC long-range transportation plans.
 
 
 
Cities and counties also address transportation in their own comprehensive plans. In addition, all jurisdictions may compose a plan for a specific corridor.
 
 
 
 
 
====<center>''Table 121.5.7 Scoring (as a percentage of TPV) of Compliance with Regional of Local Transportation Plan''</center>====
 
 
 
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto"
 
 
|+  
 
|+  
! colspan="2" style="background:#BEBEBE"|Select only one of the following plans that identify the needs
+
! style="background:#BEBEBE" |Roadway Type!! style="background:#BEBEBE" |IRI Rating Criteria for Good Condition
 
|-
 
|-
|MPO Long-Range Transportation Plan|| align="center"|100%
+
|Interstates & Other Major Routes|| <100
 
|-
 
|-
|RPC Long-Range Transportation Plan|| align="center"|80%
+
|Minor Routes (>400 vehicles per day)|| <140<sup>1</sup>
 
|-
 
|-
|City or County Comprehensive Plan|| align="center"|60%
+
|Low Volume Routes|| <170<sup>2</sup>
 
|-
 
|-
|Corridor Plan|| align="center"|60%
+
|align=left colspan=2|<sup>1</sup> Can be rated good by visual assessment for IRI <170
 +
|-
 +
|align=left colspan=2|<sup>2</sup> Can be rated good by visual assessment for IRI <220
 
|}
 
|}
[[image:121.5.8 Connectivity.jpg|right|125px|thumb|<center>'''Connectivity focuses on linking urban centers'''</center>]]
+
</center>
===121.5.8 Connectivity===
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For current condition and cost to maintain these routes see [[media:121.5.1.1.1 current.pdf|Current Asset Management Plan Summary]].
  
Connectivity between activity centers is important on the local and regional scale. Activity centers are sub-regional or sub-community districts that generate a concentration of trips such as schools and colleges, shopping centers, government complexes, apartment complexes and hospitals. The scale of activity centers is dependent on the size of the community. Activity centers relevant to a project or need should be identified in a collaborative process involving Regional Planning Commission or Metropolitan Planning Organization and local officials. Connectivity between activity centers for statewide needs may be defined as the linkage between cities and regions.
+
===121.5.1.2 Bridges===
 +
[[image:121.5.1.2.1.jpg|400px|right]]
 +
====121.5.1.2.1 Bridges Overview====
 +
Missouri has over 10,000 bridges of which over 200 are classified as a Major Bridge (greater than 1,000 feet in length). All state owned bridges are included in the AMP. For current condition and cost to maintain these bridges see [[media:121.5.1.1.1 current.pdf|Current Asset Management Plan Summary]].
  
For this process, connectivity between cities and regions focuses on linking urban centers throughout Missouri. The U.S. Census Bureau has defined cities as densely populated areas (Urban Clusters and Urbanized Areas). These urban areas are typically regional centers for trade, education, healthcare and government. For purposes of prioritization, connectivity will applies to improved connections between Urban Clusters (over 5,000 population) and/or Urbanized Areas (over 50,000 population).
+
====121.5.1.2.2 Bridges Data Collection and Analysis====
 +
[[image:121.5.1.2.2.jpg|700px|right]]
 +
All bridges are inspected regularly in accordance with federal law, typically every two years. If a bridge has known problems, it is inspected more frequently.  According to the National Bridge Inspection Standards (NBIS), condition ratings are used to describe an existing bridge or culvert compared with its condition if it were new. The ratings are based on the materials, physical condition of the deck (riding surface), the superstructure (supports immediately beneath the driving surface) and the substructures (foundation and supporting posts and piers).
  
'''Scoring:'''  For projects: Does the project improve a connection between activity centers or between cities and regions? If “yes,” award the TPV. If “no,” award zero points.
+
A condition rating is assigned for the bridge’s deck, superstructure and substructure. The lowest rating of the three components is considered the bridge rating.  
  
'''For needs:''' Does the need include a problem with sufficient connectivity between activity centers or between cities and regions? If “yes,” award the TPV. If “no,” award zero points.
+
The rating scale is:
 
+
:'''9''' – Excellent; '''8''' – Very Good; '''7''' – Good; '''6''' – Satisfactory; '''5''' – Fair; '''3''' or '''4''' – Poor; '''2 or less''' – Closed
===121.5.9 Daily Usage (DU)===
+
<center>
 
+
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto" style="text-align:center"
Defined as the total volume of traffic passing a point or segment of a highway for one year divided by the number of days in the year and number of through lanes. The AADT and the number of through lanes can be found in [http://tmshome TMS] in the SOS Detail Browser.
 
 
 
'''Data:'''
 
 
 
NL = Number of through (driving) lanes
 
 
 
AADT = Annual Average Daily Traffic
 
 
 
DU = Daily Usage
 
 
 
'''Formula:'''
 
 
 
DU = AADT/NL
 
 
 
Total Points = ( DU / 17,500 )<sup>2</sup> × TPV
 
 
 
===121.5.10 Detour Length===
 
See [[121.5 Prioritization Factors#121.5.36 User Cost Index (Detour Length)|User Costs]].
 
 
 
===121.5.11 District Factors/Flexible Points===
 
 
 
MoDOT districts, in collaboration with MoDOT’s planning partners, designate additional factors to be used to evaluate each investment goal. Factors from other prioritization processes may be used as a district factor. Districts may also increase the point value of factors used in the core process. The use of points for other factors should be documented as an addendum to this article.
 
 
 
===121.5.12 Elimination of Bike/Pedestrian Barriers===
 
 
 
The elimination of bike and pedestrian barriers is necessary to promote an integrated walking and biking system in Missouri communities. This prioritization factor focuses on areas where a bike and/or pedestrian need is likely. Items 3 and 4 should be used only when items 1 or 2 do not apply.
 
 
 
====<center>''Table 121.5.12 Scoring (as a percentage of TPV) of Elimination of Bike/Pedestrian Barriers''</center>====
 
 
 
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto"
 
 
|+  
 
|+  
! colspan="2" style="background:#BEBEBE"|Scoring:  The project scores are the sum of the points for each of the following
+
! style="background:#BEBEBE" |NBIS!! style="background:#BEBEBE" |Thresholds for Bridge Condition
 +
|-
 +
|9||rowspan=3|Good
 
|-
 
|-
|1. Project improves a '''bike''' connection between complimentary land uses (e.g. between commercial, institutional and residential uses) or between complimentary land uses and transit stops. || align="center"|40%
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|8
 
|-
 
|-
| 2. Project improves a '''pedestrian''' connection between complimentary land uses (e.g. between commercial, institutional and residential uses) or between complimentary land uses and transit stops.|| align="center"|60%
+
|7
 
|-
 
|-
|3. Project brings an ''existing'' pedestrian connection into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). || align="center"|20%
+
|6||rowspan=2|Fair
 
|-
 
|-
|4. Project provides bike and/or pedestrian accommodations not applicable to any of the above situations. || align="center"|20%
+
|5
 
|-
 
|-
|5. Project provides ''no'' bike or pedestrian accommodations || align="center"|0%
+
|4||rowspan=2|Poor
 
|-
 
|-
| Maximum Possible Total Points || align="center"|100%
+
|3
 
|}
 
|}
 +
</center>
 +
The bridge TMS applications with the bridge NBIS data gathered from field inspections make up the Bridge Management System (BMS).  MoDOT has collected and maintained inventory and condition information on National Bridge Inventory (NBI) structures since 1971.  An NBI structure is defined as a bridge or culvert that has an opening of at least 20 feet along the centerline of the roadway, is open to the public, and carries vehicular traffic as per 23 CFR 650.
 +
 +
The vast majority of bridges in Missouri are inspected by MoDOT personnel with a small number inspected by consultants or by the local bridge owner.  Most are inspected on a two year frequency while a few are done more frequently.  MoDOT has worked with FHWA to develop criteria for inspecting some lower risk structures on a 48-month frequency.  This is a tool available to MoDOT District Bridge Engineers to help reduce the bridge inspection workload.
  
===121.5.13 Environmental Index===
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Historically, a 50-year service life was anticipated for bridges; however, starting in 2010, structures are anticipated to have a 75-year service life. Major bridges designed since 2000 are anticipated to have a 100-year service life. One of the challenges with managing the bridge assets is the wave of bridges built in the 1950s and 1960s that are all reaching the end of their service life at about the same time.
 
 
As part of MoDOT’s investment goal to protect the natural environment, the Federal environmental review process is used as an indicator for environmental impact.  This factor specifically favors projects where no environmental mitigation is required.
 
 
 
'''Scoring:'''  Does the project require environmental mitigation? If “yes,” award zero points. If “no,” award TPV.
 
  
===121.5.14 Exceptional Bridge===
+
When programming bridge work, MoDOT takes a multi-pronged approach with varying work types. With the amount of poor bridges in Missouri, several replacements or redecks are needed per year; however, it is more cost effective to spend a portion of the limited funds on keeping Fair bridges Fair and Good bridges Good.  This is done through a combination of rehabilitations and preventive maintenance projects.  The expected life is 7 to 20 years for bridge rehabilitation.
  
An exceptional bridge is one that has a deck or superstructure rating of 4 or less; or a substructure rating of 5 or less and one of the following items: permanent shoring, requires extensive or habitual maintenance, or requires maintenance beyond the capabilities of the MoDOT district’s repair crews.
+
==121.5.2 Asset Management Policy Guidelines==
  
'''Scoring:'''  Does the project rehabilitate or replace an exceptional bridge? If “yes,” award TPV. If “no,” award zero points.
+
===121.5.2.1 MoDOT’s Asset Management Statewide Goals===
  
===121.5.15 Freight Bottlenecks===
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:* Keep Major Routes in at least 90% good condition. This target goal is reflected in the MoDOT Tracker Measure 2a.
[[image:121.5.15 freight.jpg|right|200px]]
+
:* Keep Minors Routes (greater than 400 vehicles per day) in at least 80% good condition.  This target goal is reflected in the MoDOT Tracker Measure 2a.
MoDOT districts in consultation with RPCs and MPOs identify freight bottlenecks. Examples of freight bottlenecks include load posted bridges, inadequate vertical or horizontal clearances, or gaps in the freight movement system.
+
:* Keep Low Volume Routes (Minors Routes with fewer than 400 vehicles per day) in at least 70% good condition. This target goal is reflected in the MoDOT Tracker Measure 2a. These routes are not included in the AMP. They are maintained by MoDOT Maintenance forces and the plan for these routes is managed by [http://sharepoint/systemdelivery/mt/default.aspx Central Office Maintenance Division] and MoDOT districts.
 +
:* Bridges – maintain the square foot bridge deck in the poor condition from 2016. The square foot of bridge deck in poor condition in 2016 was 4,925,371, which equates to approximately 900 bridges as represented in MoDOT Tracker Measure 2b.
  
'''Scoring:'''  Does this project eliminate one or more freight bottlenecks? If “yes,” award TPV. If “no,” award zero points.
+
<center>
 
+
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto" style="text-align:center"
===121.5.16 Functional Classification===
 
 
 
The [http://www.modot.org/newsandinfo/functionalclassificationmaps/index.htm Functional Classification] (FC) system groups streets and highways according to the character of service they are intended to provide. The FC can be found in [http://tmshome TMS] in the SOS Detail Browser. For purposes of this process, the principal arterial functional classification is further divided into design types: interstates, freeways, expressways and other principal arterials.
 
 
 
====<center>''Table 121.5.17 Scoring (as a percentage of TPV) of Functional Classification''</center>====
 
 
 
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto"
 
 
|+  
 
|+  
! colspan="2" style="background:#BEBEBE"|Functional Class || style="background:#BEBEBE"|% TPV
+
! style="background:#BEBEBE" |Asset Category!! style="background:#BEBEBE" |Asset Management Statewide Goal
 
|-
 
|-
| rowspan="4"|Principal Arterials||Interstate|| align="center"|100%
+
|Major Routes – Pavements ||90% Good
 
|-
 
|-
|Freeway|| align="center"|100%
+
|Minor Routes (>400 vehicles per day) – Pavements ||80% Good
 
|-
 
|-
| Expressway||align="center"|100%
+
|Low Volume Routes (<400 vehicles per day) - Pavements ||70% Good
 
|-
 
|-
|Other|| align="center"|100%
+
|Bridges – Poor condition by square feet ||<4,925,371 square feet
 
|-
 
|-
| align="center"|-||Major Collector|| align="center"|50%
+
|Bridges – Poor condition by number ||<900 bridges
|-
 
| align="center"|-||Minor Arterial|| align="center"|40%
 
|-
 
| align="center"|-||Minor Collector|| align="center"|40%
 
|-
 
| align="center"|-||Collector|| align="center"|20%
 
|-
 
| align="center"|-||Local|| align="center"|20%
 
|-
 
| align="center"|-||Other|| align="center"|0%
 
 
|}
 
|}
 +
</center>
 +
The district asset management plan should serve as a <u>guide</u> when programming projects into the five-year STIP.  For example, the asset management plan might indicate 100 miles of interstate be treated each year, but it does not indicated which 100 miles need treated in that particular year. However, 100 miles should be the target to hit when programming miles to be treated on the interstate in the STIP.  The same concept is used for bridges, the asset management plan is a guide to help program the right amount of bridge work to keep the system in good condition.
  
===121.5.17 Functional Obsolescence of Bridge===
+
===121.5.2.2 Pavements===
  
See [[121.5 Prioritization Factors#121.5.30 Substandard Bridge Features|Substandard Bridge Features]].
+
:* Overall strategy is to keep good roads in good condition using thin, lower cost preventative maintenance treatments before road conditions worsen and require more costly treatments.
 +
:* Pavement reconstruction will be limited.
 +
:* Shoulder work should be limited and only used as necessary rather than routine.
 +
:* Districts will determine the treatment type, life expectancy and cost/mile for the district specific models and document in their plan how the data was determined.
 +
:* The cost/mile will reflect <u>total project cost</u>/mile not solely pavement cost/lane mile.  Total project costs could include items such as:  guardrail, grading, coldmilling, mobilization, striping, rumbles, shoulders, traffic control, pavement repair, ADA etc.
  
===121.5.18 Intermodal Freight Connectivity===
+
===121.5.2.3 Bridges===
{|style="padding: 0.3em; margin-left:15px; border:1px solid #a9a9a9; text-align:center; font-size: 95%; background:#ffddcc" width="240px" align="right"
 
|-
 
|'''Intermodal Connections, Port Access'''
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/UnNumbrd/RDT02005.pdf Report, 2002]
 
|-
 
|'''Columbia Terminal Railroad Feasibility Analysis'''
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/Rd09025/or09024.pdf Report, 2009]
 
|-
 
|'''See also:''' [http://www.modot.gov/services/OR/byDate.htm Innovation Library]
 
|}
 
  
Intermodal connectivity includes improving connections between transportation modes for freight. Intermodal freight facilities are identified by MoDOT districts, RPCs and MPOs and include water ports, airports, rail terminals and truck terminals. Emphasis should be placed on connectivity between facilities where freight changes modes.
+
:* Overall strategy is to keep bridges in good condition by maintaining the square foot of bridge deck that is considered poor to the level that was realized in 2016. To accomplish this, MoDOT is using a two-pronged approach.  First, fair and good condition bridges must be addressed with preventative maintenance treatments.  Second, poor condition bridges will be replaced/redecked.
 +
:* Each district will work with [http://sharepoint/systemdelivery/br/Pages/default.aspx Central Office Bridge Division] to establish the replacement/redeck/other (PM/rehab) goals specific to that district and based upon the condition of bridges in that particular district.
 +
:* The cost/sqft will reflect <u>total project cost</u>/sqft not solely bridge cost/sqft.  Total project costs could include: roadway pavement costs, mobilization, striping, guardrail, traffic control etc.
 +
:* Major Bridges (1000 feet or longer), are on a planned schedule for replacement/rehab.  The [http://sharepoint/systemdelivery/BR/_layouts/xlviewer.aspx?id=%2Fsystemdelivery%2FBR%2FMajor%20Bridges%2FMajor%20Bridge%20Asset%20Management%20Information%2Exlsx&DefaultItemOpen=1 Major Bridge Asset Management Plan] must be reviewed by the district and if changes need to be made to the cost, type of work and/or year of construction, contact Central Office Bridge Division as they maintain the master file.
 +
:* District Maintenance will continue to perform regular preventative maintenance activities, including bridge flushing and deck sealing.
  
'''Scoring:'''  Does the PROJECT improve connectivity with an intermodal freight facility OR is this a NEED to provide a better connection to an intermodal freight facility? If “yes,” award TPV. If “no,” award zero points.
+
===121.5.2.4 ADA===
  
===121.5.19 International Roughness Index (IRI)===
+
:* Transition plan must be completed by 2027. Each district outlines the cost to complete the plan and shows how they plan to program the remaining amount.
See [[121.5 Prioritization Factors#121.5.25 Pavement Smoothness|Pavement Smoothness]].
+
:* For most districts, it will take more funds than what is received from the Transportation Alternative funds to pay for the rest of the transition plan work.
 +
:* Standalone ADA projects can be accounted for in the Asset Management Plan or ADA can be included in pavement projects.
  
===121.5.20 Level of Economic Distress===
+
===121.5.2.5 General Programming based on Asset Management===
  
The level of economic distress is measured through poverty rates and unemployment levels within the project area or corridor. The poverty rate will be compared with statewide and regional or district averages. For purposes of prioritization, an unemployment rate of 10% or more is considered high.
+
:* Each district’s funding will continue to be based on the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission’s Funding Distribution Policy.  All districts distributed funds are accounted for in the Asset Management plans including Safety and Open Container Funds.
 +
:* The concept of practical design still serves as the expectation for project development.
 +
:* The use of core teams is essential in the project development process. Not all improvements desired by the team members make the scope that ultimately gets programmed.  The project manager’s responsibility is to develop a project that meets the purpose and need. 
 +
:* Scoping and Programming – Having a project fully scoped and designed up to preliminary plans is necessary to set the initial project programming budget. After being programmed, the project budget growth is limited to 3% per year.
  
====<center>''Table 121.5.20 Scoring for Level of Economic Distress''</center>====
+
===121.5.2.6 What Does the Asset Management Plan (AMP) Tell Me?===
  
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto"
+
:* The AMP is based on a 10-year window and it indicates if the district has any funds leftover after taking care of bridges and pavements in the AMP.
|+
+
:* If a district has any leftover funds, i.e. the district can meet their AMP goals, then system improvement projects can be programmed.
! colspan="2" style="background:#BEBEBE"|Scoring:  The project scores are the sum of the points for each of the following
+
:* If a district does not have any leftover funds i.e. the district cannot meet their AMP goals, then tradeoff discussions must take place within the district and planning partners. Priority will be given to the interstate and major routes (NHS) as the FAST Act emphasizes maintaining these routes.
|-
 
|The percentage of persons below the poverty level in the project area is higher than the statewide average. || align="center"|30%
 
|-
 
| The percentage of persons below the poverty level in the project area is high than the RPC level.|| align="center"|40%
 
|-
 
| Unemployment is greater than 10% || align="center"|30%
 
|-
 
| Unemployment is between 5% and 10% || align="center"|15%
 
|-
 
| Unemployment is less than 5% || align="center"|0%
 
|-
 
| Maximum Possible Total Points || align="center"|100%
 
|}
 
 
 
 
 
===121.5.21 [[902.12 Glossary#Level of Service (LOS)|Level of Service]]===
 
 
 
Level of Service (LOS) is current year LOS and is a measure describing operational conditions within a traffic stream. Six LOS are defined for each type of facility. Letters designate each level, from A to F, with LOS A representing best operating conditions and Level of Service F the worst. For each process, the project is assigned a number of points based on the level of service currently experienced in the corridor. The worse the level of service is, the higher the score is.  
 
 
 
'''Scoring (as a percentage of TPV):'''
 
 
 
:LOS A, 0%
 
 
 
:LOS B, 20%
 
 
 
:LOS C, 40%
 
 
 
:LOS D, 60%
 
  
:LOS E, 80%
+
For current conditions, costs to maintain the system, work types, life cycles etc., see [[media:121.5.1.1.1 current.pdf|Current Asset Management Plan Summary]].
  
:LOS F, 100%
+
==121.5.3 Lifecycle Planning & Preventive Maintenance==
  
===121.5.22 Load Rating===
+
Ideally, every mile of pavement and every bridge in the state would be in good condition. Unfortunately, funding is not available to improve and maintain Missouri’s entire transportation system in good condition, so priorities must be established. Significant investments have been made to improve pavement and bridge conditions over the last decade.  
  
Load Rating should be scored based on the load capacity of the structure. If a major structure is load-posted for legal loads, then it should always have the highest score. If no load posting exists, then the inventory rating can be used to come up with a score of the load capacity of the structure in relation to the current design loading. The inventory rating is a representation of the load capacity of a structure in relation to current design loads.
+
[[image:121.5.3 satisfaction.jpg|center|650px]]
  
'''Scoring:'''
+
A previous significant investment known as The Smooth Roads Initiative (SRI) improved 2,200 miles of Missouri’s most heavily traveled roads. This program was completed in late 2006 and was mostly comprised of very thin resurfacing treatments to improve the smoothness of the pavement.  Missouri’s Major Route system went from approximately 45 percent good pavements to 85 percent good pavements with this initiative and other strategic investments. The goal is to maintain these improved smooth surfaces. As you can see from the chart above, when road smoothness increases on major routes, so does customer satisfaction.
  
a. If bridge is posted for Legal Loads then the score = 100% TPV
+
The underlying goal of MoDOT’s asset management plan is to maintain the current condition of pavements and bridges.  The most cost effective method to preserve pavements and bridges is to use preventive maintenance treatments while the assets are still in good/fair condition. The chart below shows the basic strategy for MoDOT’s AMP – focused on less expensive preservation treatments more often than expensive rehabilitation and reconstruction treatments less often. The objective is to slow down the rate of deterioration and provide a smooth, durable and safe roadway for users at the lowest cost.
  
b. If Bridge is not posted for Legal Loads, then determine the score as follows:
+
[[image:121.5.3 lifecycle.jpg|center|375px]]
  
:Score = [ 1- ( inventory rating ) ÷ 36 ] × TPV
+
Lifecycle planning should not be confused with life cycle cost analysis (LCCA).  LCCA is performed at the project level and compares specific treatment options against each other, for example, concrete vs. asphalt on a pavement project.  Lifecycle planning is performed at the network level where the needs of all roads and structures within that particular network are considered.
  
===121.5.23 Metropolitan (MPO) Long-range Transportation Plan===
+
===121.5.3.1 Pavements===
 +
Keeping good roads in good condition is the basic premise of MoDOT’s AMP. The pavement treatment costs for this approach are slightly different for interstates vs. major routes vs. minor routes.  Predicting the future costs to keep roadways in good condition involves estimating the type of treatment work needed for each roadway category, when those treatments will be needed and how long those treatments will be effective.  The effective life of pavement is most commonly impacted by the traffic volume, preventive maintenance activities, ground support and quality of the materials used in the pavement. For example, interstate routes require a more expensive, heavy-duty pavement to withstand higher traffic volumes and truck traffic.
  
See [[121.5 Prioritization Factors#121.5.7 Compliance with Regional or Local Transportation Plans|Compliance with Regional or Local Transportation Plan]]
+
MoDOT’s approach to pavement preservation is applying a thin, preventive maintenance treatment on a routine cycle. This is the most cost effective way to keep the roads in good condition for the traveling public and preserve the investments made over the last decade. In rare instances, pavements will need a full depth replacement, but properly designed and maintained pavements should only require a preventive maintenance treatment to extend its full life. In addition to the cyclical preventive maintenance treatments, other preventive maintenance treatments such as crack sealing and pavement repairs are performed to further extend the pavements useful life. 
  
===121.5.24 Pavement Condition===
+
For the treatment assumptions, treatment life and average cost for interstate and major routes see [[media:121.5.1.1.1 current.pdf|Current Asset Management Plan Summary]].
  
The Pavement Condition score includes distresses (cracking, rutting, spalling, etc.) that are present in the pavement. The range for the condition score is 0 to 20 with 20 indicating pavement in perfect condition. The table shows the pavement condition score and the classification of the pavement condition (“good”, “fair”, “poor”, etc.) The relationship between pavement condition and the prioritization score is shown in the last column of the table.
+
===121.5.3.2 Bridges===
 +
Since Missouri has a large number of poor condition bridges, a preventive maintenance approach alone will not be sufficient to maintain current conditions. A combination of a preventive maintenance approach to prolong the useful life of Missouri’s existing bridges and an aggressive bridge repair/replacement program is needed to maintain current bridge conditions.
  
====<center>''Table 121.5.24 Pavement Condition''</center>====
+
====121.5.3.2.1 Bridge Preventive Maintenance====
 +
MoDOT also performs preventive maintenance activities for bridges. These activities are crucial to providing the lowest lifecycle costs and include:
 +
:* Bridge cleaning and flushing to remove dirt and debris and to allow proper drainage and drying of the deck. The dirt and debris holds moisture and chlorides that cause deterioration. Deck flushing is done in the fall and spring with a thorough cleaning of entire bridge done in the spring following snow season and again in the fall prior to snow season. This cleaning includes the bridge deck, piers, abutments and lower chords of truss bridges. The goal is to flush all bridges each year.
 +
:* Bridge joint and deck sealing is done to prevent dirt, debris and chlorides from deteriorating the deck and supporting bridge members. Sealing activities are performed on a cyclic basis as well as condition basis.
 +
:* Spot painting of bearings and pilings is done to protect from rusting and is performed on an as-needed basis.
  
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto"
+
====121.5.3.2.2 Typical Bridges (shorter than 1000 feet) Bridge Work Type====
|+
+
MoDOT will do a combination of replacements, redecks, rehabilitation and preventive maintenance treatments to maintain current conditions. Bridge work varies in price per bridge and type of work being performed. For the treatment assumptions, treatment life and average cost for work types see [[media:121.5.1.1.1 current.pdf|Current Asset Management Plan Summary]].
! rowspan="2" style="background:#BEBEBE" align="center"|Condition Classification || style="background:#BEBEBE" colspan="2" align="center"|Condition Score || rowspan="2"  style="background:#BEBEBE" align="center"|Score (% TPV)
 
|-
 
!style="background:#BEBEBE" align="center"|NHS || style="background:#BEBEBE" align="center"|Non-NHS
 
|-
 
|Very Good|| align="center"|18.9 – 20|| align="center"|18.9 – 20|| align="center"|0%
 
|-
 
| Good|| align="center"|17.8 – 18.8|| align="center"|17.7 – 18.8|| align="center"|25%
 
|-
 
| Fair|| align="center"|16.4 – 17.7|| align="center"|15.9 – 17.6|| align="center"|50%
 
|-
 
| Poor|| align="center"|15.3 – 16.3|| align="center"|14.3 – 15.8|| align="center"|75%
 
|-
 
| Very Poor|| align="center"|0 – 15.2|| align="center"|0 14.2|| align="center"|100%
 
|}
 
{|style="padding: 0.3em; margin-left:15px; border:1px solid #a9a9a9; text-align:center; font-size: 95%; background:#ffddcc" width="210px" align="right"
 
|-
 
|'''Pavement Smoothness and Fuel Efficiency'''
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/Ri05040/ss06003.pdf Summary 2006]
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/Ri05040/ss09002.pdf Summary 2008]
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/Ri05040/or07005.pdf Report Report 2006]
 
|-
 
|'''Pavement Smoothness Measures'''
 
|-
 
|[http://library.modot.mo.gov/RDT/reports/Ri06003/or06017.pdf Report 2006]
 
|-
 
|'''See also:''' [http://www.modot.gov/services/OR/byDate.htm Innovation Library]
 
|}
 
  
===121.5.25 Pavement Smoothness===
+
Historically, MoDOT has approached bridge work by the “worst first” method. Asset management has changed the focus from a “worst first” approach to a multi-focused approach including not only full replacements of poor bridges, but also on preventive maintenance of fair condition bridges.  The preventive maintenance can be rehabilitation work or traditional type preventive maintenance such as flushing.  The focus on preventive maintenance allows MoDOT to keep more bridges in a fair condition much longer.
  
The International Roughness Index (IRI) measures smoothness. The IRI varies from approximately “0” to “300”, with “0” indicating a perfect roadway. The measurement for IRI used and how the ratings are scored in the prioritization process is shown in the table below.
+
====121.5.3.2.3 Major Bridges (1000 feet or longer) – Bridge Work Type====
 +
A major bridge is greater than 1,000 feet in length. The concept of preventive maintenance to maintain current condition is also used on the major bridges in Missouri.  Unfortunately, several of the major bridges in Missouri are also well over their useful life and are in need of a full costly replacement. MoDOT currently has over 200 major bridges with approximately 11 percent categorized as poor condition and are in need of replacement, and 63 percent are in the fair condition category.
  
====<center>''Table 121.5.25 Pavement Smoothness''</center>====
+
==121.5.4 Funding Assets==
  
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto"
+
The Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission uses a formula to distribute construction program funds for road and bridge improvements to each of its districts. This is the largest area of MoDOT’s budget that provides funding for safety improvements, asset management and system improvement funds that districts can use to take care of the system or invest in major projects that improve safety, relieve congestion and spur economic growth.
|+
+
{| style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto"  
!style="background:#BEBEBE"| Smoothness Rating || style="background:#BEBEBE" align="center"|IRI!!style="background:#BEBEBE" align="center"|Score (% TPV)
 
|-
 
|Very Good|| align="center"|<60||align="center"|0%
 
|-
 
| Good|| align="center"|60 - 94||align="center"|25%
 
|-
 
| Fair|| align="center"|95 - 170|| align="center"|50%
 
 
|-
 
|-
| Mediocre|| align="center"|171 - 220||align="center"|75%
+
|[[image:121.5.4.pdf|right|475px]]
 
|-
 
|-
|Poor|| align="center"|>220||align="center"|100%
+
|align=center|'''Construction Program Funds Distribution'''
 
|}
 
|}
 +
Once construction program funds are distributed to districts, MoDOT collaborates with regional planning groups to identify local priorities based on projected available funding.  The regional transportation improvement plans are brought together to form the department’s STIP, which outlines five years of transportation improvements.  As one year of the plan is accomplished, another year is added.
  
===121.5.26 Safety Concern===
+
Beginning in Fiscal Year 2022, the Asset Management category allocation amount is based on needs identified in MoDOT’s Asset Management Plan and will be reviewed and updated, if necessary, annually. These amounts will include inflation consistent with MoDOT’s Asset Management PlanThe allocation is distributed as follows:
 
 
MoDOT receives input from the public and officials from other government agencies that includes numerous safety concerns. Some of these concerns are backed and some are not by MoDOT’s safety dataBoth types of safety concerns have a role in this prioritization process.
 
 
 
Safety concerns should be identified through documented trends in MoDOT customer service reports, public input from the planning process, and input from local and regional planning partners.
 
  
'''Scoring:'''  Does the PROJECT address a documented safety concern OR is the NEED a documented safety concern? If “yes,” award TPV. If “no,” award zero points.
+
:* Major Bridges (1000 feet or longer)
 +
:* Asset Management – Remaining asset management total distributed based on formulas that average:
 +
::• Percent of total Vehicles Miles Traveled (VMT) on the National Highway System and remaining arterials.
 +
::• Percent of square feet of typical state bridge deck (shorter than 1000 feet) on the total state system.
 +
::• Percent of total lane miles of National Highway System and remaining arterials.
  
===121.5.27 Safety Enhancements===
+
Beginning in Fiscal Year 2022 and every year thereafter, the remaining funds, System Improvements, must be first used to meet asset management goals, and then remaining funds may be used for other priorities.
  
Safety Enhancements include the need for items such as guardrail, guard cable, clear zones, etc.
+
Distribution based on the average of:
 +
:* Percent of total population.
 +
:* Percent of total employment.
 +
:* Percent of total VMT on the National Highway System and remaining arterials.
 +
<div id="Major Bridges are funded"></div>
 +
Major Bridges are funded under the Asset Management funding category as shown above.  Each year the Major Bridge asset management information found in the [http://epg.modot.org/files/9/99/121.5.5_needs.pdf 10-year Major Bridge Needs] will be reviewed and updated by MoDOT districts and Central Office Bridge Division.  If the bridge work falls within the first 3 years of the 5-year STIP, the year and dollar amounts need to be very accurate.  The scope of work for Major Bridges needs to be detailed showing all the work items beyond the bridge work such as:  adding lanes, expanded shoulder width, lighting, ADA accommodations, aesthetics, etc.  All items of work beyond the scope of the bridge itself require the approval of the Chief Engineer to use Major Bridge asset management funds.  Roadway tie-ins and traffic control will be considered part of the cost of the bridge and funded from the asset management category, however significant roadway work is not considered part of the Major Bridge and will require the approval of the Chief Engineer to use Major Bridge asset management funds.  Any overruns in the project budget for scope considered beyond the Major Bridge work must be funded by the district, all underruns in the project budget will be allocated by the established funding distribution with the exception of funds from other sources that may be allocated by a pro rata share with the approval of the Chief Engineer.
  
'''Scoring:'''  Does the PROJECT address a need for safety enhancements? If “yes,” award TPV. If “no,” award zero points.
+
==121.5.5 Asset Management Updates==
 
+
{|style="padding: 0.3em; margin-left:9px; border:2px solid #a9a9a9; text-align:center; font-size: 95%; background:#f5f5f5" width="210px" align="right"  
===121.5.28 Safety Index===
 
 
 
The safety index is made up of the following components:
 
 
 
1. Accident Index (10%) – compares the total accident rate to the statewide rate
 
 
 
2. Severity Index (60%) - compares the rate of injury and fatal crashes to statewide rates
 
 
 
3. High Accident Index (15%) - assigns a value based on locations that show up on the annual high accident listing
 
 
 
4. Wet / Dry Index (15%) – assigns a value based on locations that show up on the annual wet/dry listing
 
 
 
The Safety Index (SI) can be found in [http://tmshome/TMS/TMS.html TMS] in the SOS Detail Browser. The values are based on Traffic Information Segments (typically major intersection to major intersection). The value of the SI will be a number between 1 and 5; with 5 being a safety rating of “Very Good” and 1 being a safety rating of “Very Poor”. If the project encompasses more than one Traffic Information Segment, then the SI shall be a weighted average based on the length of each segment.
 
 
 
'''Data:'''
 
SI = Safety Index
 
 
 
'''Formula:'''
 
Total Points = (5 – SI ) × ¼ × TPV
 
 
 
===121.5.29 Strategic Economic Corridor===
 
 
 
Strategic Economic Corridors are corridors that connect regional economic centers in Missouri and adjacent states. The regional economic centers selected for this process are based on information from the Missouri Department of Economic Development and the Office of Social and Economic Data Analysis at the University of Missouri. All interstates are considered strategic economic corridors. A list of regional economic centers and examples of strategic economic corridors follows:
 
 
 
[[image:121.5.29.1a.jpg|250px|left|thumb|<center>'''Cape Girardeau'''</center>]] [[image:121.5.29.1b.jpg|225px|right|thumb|<center>'''Jefferson City'''</center>]]
 
====<center>''Table 121.5.29.1 Regional Economic Centers''</center>====
 
{|border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto"
 
|+
 
!style="background:#BEBEBE" align="center"|Missouri!! style="background:#BEBEBE" align="center"|Out of State
 
|-
 
| align="center"|Branson || align="center"|Omaha, NE
 
|-
 
| align="center"|Cape Girardeau|| align="center"|Fayetteville, AR
 
|-
 
| align="center"|Chillicothe-Brookfield || align="center"|Jonesboro, AR
 
|-
 
| align="center"| Columbia || align="center"|Paducah, KY
 
|-
 
| align="center"| Farmington || align="center"|Memphis, TN
 
|-
 
| align="center"|Fort Leonard Wood || align="center"|Springfield, IL
 
|-
 
| align="center"|Hannibal || align="center"|Quincy, IL
 
|-
 
| align="center"| Jefferson City || align="center"|Ottumwa, IA
 
|-
 
| align="center"|Joplin || align="center"|Des Moines, IA
 
|-
 
| align="center"| Kansas City || align="center"|Pittsburg, KS
 
|-
 
| align="center"| Kirksville || align="center"|Wichita, KS
 
|-
 
| align="center"|Lake of the Ozarks || align="center"|Tulsa, OK
 
|-
 
| align="center"| Poplar Bluff || align="center"|-
 
|-
 
| align="center"| Rolla || align="center"|-
 
 
|-
 
|-
| align="center"| Sedalia || align="center"|-
+
|'''Additional Information<br/>about Bridge Costs'''
 
|-
 
|-
| align="center"| Sikeston || align="center"|-
+
|[[media:121.5.5 needs.pdf|10-Year Major Bridge Needs, 2019]]
|-
 
| align="center"| Springfield || align="center"|-
 
|-
 
| align="center"| St. Joseph || align="center"|-
 
|-
 
| align="center"| St. Louis (including St. Charles) || align="center"|-
 
|-
 
| align="center"| Warrensburg-Knob Knoster || align="center"|-
 
|-
 
| align="center"| West Plains || align="center"|-
 
 
|}
 
|}
 +
The Asset Management Plan (AMP) is a 10-year rolling plan.  Each year every MoDOT district will update the AMP assumptions including:  pavement cost per mile, bridge cost per square foot, treatment type, treatment life, number of miles and/or bridges being treated to align with the most current data for the region.  The [[media:121.5.1.1.1 current.pdf|Current Asset Management Plan Summary]] document is updated yearly to reflect the statewide overall totals and assumptions that are included in the AMP.  Below is the rolling timeline associated with producing yearly updates to the AMP.
  
 +
[[image:121.5.5.jpg|center|750px]]
 +
<center>'''Asset Management Rolling Timeline'''</center>
  
====<center>''Table 121.5.29.2 Example Corridors''</center>====
+
[http://sharepoint/systemdelivery/tp/Pages/default.aspx Central Office Transportation Planning Division] houses numerous documents and information for the asset management plan and can be found on the Transportation Planning Division’s Sharepoint siteThis information is important when preparing the district’s annual AMP update or to simply refer to in the program delivery process.   The documents located on the Sharepoint site are (but not limited to): Instructions to districts for updating their yearly plan, contact information, AMP timeline, historic pavement and bridge data, and each district’s specific asset management plan.
 
 
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="margin: 1em auto 1em auto"
 
|+
 
| align="center"|I-70 || Topeka - Kansas City – Columbia – St. Louis
 
|-
 
| align="center"|I-44||  Tulsa - Joplin – Springfield – Ft. Wood – Rolla –St. Louis
 
|-
 
| align="center"|I-35 || Kansas City – Des Moines
 
|-
 
| align="center"|I-55 || St. Louis – Cape Girardeau – Sikeston – Memphis
 
|-
 
| align="center"|I-29 || Kansas City – St. Joseph – Omaha
 
|-
 
| align="center"|U.S. 60/360 || Springfield – Poplar Bluff – Sikeston – Paducah
 
|-
 
| align="center"|U.S. 36 || Hannibal – Chillicothe – St. Joseph
 
|-
 
| align="center"| U.S. 71 || Maryville – St. Joseph – Kansas City – Joplin – Fayetteville
 
|-
 
| align="center"|U.S. 60/Route 37 || Springfield – Fayetteville
 
|-
 
| align="center"| U.S. 54 || Wichita – Lake of the Ozarks – Jefferson City
 
|-
 
| align="center"| Route 5 || Springfield – Lake of the Ozarks – Jefferson City
 
|-
 
| align="center"|Route 13 || Kansas City – Springfield
 
|-
 
| align="center"| U.S. 63 || Ottumwa – Kirksville - Columbia – Jefferson City – Rolla – West Plains
 
|-
 
| align="center"| U.S. 65 || Des Moines – Chillicothe – Sedalia – Springfield – Branson
 
|-
 
| align="center"| U.S. 50 || Kansas City – Warrensburg/Knob Noster – Sedalia – Jefferson City – St. Louis
 
|-
 
| align="center"| U.S. 67 || St. Louis – Farmington – Poplar Bluff 
 
|-
 
| align="center"| Route 171/U.S. 400 || Joplin – Pittsburg -- Wichita
 
|-
 
| align="center"| All other interstates || Various
 
|}
 
 
 
'''Scoring:'''  Does the project improve a strategic economic corridor? If “yes,” award TPV. If “no,”award zero points.
 
 
 
===121.5.30 Substandard Bridge Features===
 
 
 
Bridges that do not meet the standards of MoDOT’s long-range transportation plan are considered obsolete.
 
 
 
'''Scoring:''' Does the PROJECT address substandard bridge features OR are substandard bridge features part of this NEED? If “yes,” award TPV. If “no,” award zero points.
 
 
 
===121.5.31 Substandard Roadway Features===
 
 
 
Substandard roadway features include aspects such as the lane width or shoulder width, as defined in MoDOT’s long-range transportation plan.
 
 
 
'''Scoring:'''  Does the PROJECT address substandard roadway features OR are substandard roadway features part of this NEED? If “yes,” award TPV. If “no,” award zero points.
 
 
 
===121.5.32 Supports Regional Economic Development Plans===
 
 
 
The potential to promote economic development is determined by compliance with the regional economic development plan. Some RPCs have prepared a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS). MPOs have an economic development component in their LRTPs. RPCs and MPOs must use these as their regional economic development plans. Where there is no current CEDS, the RPC or MPO is tasked with identifying the economic development plan for their area. The RPC or MPO may use regional and community economic development plans written by the local Chambers, cities and counties, or economic partnerships. RPCs and MPOs will be responsible for determining if a project is in compliance with the regional economic development plan, or if the need is identified in the regional economic development plan.
 
 
 
'''Scoring:'''  Does this project or need comply with a Regional Economic Development Plan? If “yes,” award TPV. If “no,” award zero points.
 
 
 
===121.5.33 System Efficiency===
 
 
 
System efficiency promotes improved traffic flow without adding lanes to a roadway. Some examples of system efficiency techniques are access management, [[:Category:910 Intelligent Transportation Systems|intelligent transportation systems]], and transportation demand management.
 
 
 
'''Scoring (as a percentage of TPV):'''
 
 
 
:Project does not include system efficiency elements: 0%
 
 
 
:Project includes elements of both roadway expansion and system efficiency: 50%
 
 
 
:Project improves system efficiency without roadway expansion: 100%
 
 
 
===121.5.34 Truck Usage===
 
 
 
Truck usage is used to indicate the impact of heavy vehicles on the state system and the movement of freight on the state system.
 
 
 
'''Data:'''
 
 
 
VTR = Estimated Volume of Trucks
 
 
 
NL = Number of through (driving) lanes
 
 
 
TU = Truck Usage
 
 
 
'''Formula:'''
 
 
 
:TU = VTR/NL
 
 
 
Total Points = (5 × TU )<sup>1/2</sup> ÷ 100 × TPV
 
 
 
===121.5.35 Truck Volume===
 
 
 
Truck volume is used to indicate movement of freight on the state roadway system. The estimated volume of trucks is found in [http://tmshome/TMS/TMS.html TMS] as TOTAL COMMERCIAL VOLUME.
 
 
 
'''Data:'''
 
 
 
TV = Total Commercial Volume
 
 
 
'''Formula:'''
 
 
 
:Total Points = (2.5 × TU )<sup>1/2</sup> ÷ 100 × TPV
 
 
 
===121.5.36 User Cost Index (Detour Length)===
 
 
 
User cost, for purposes of the prioritization process, currently only considers detour length. The detour length is weighted by the amount of traffic to give the prioritization score.
 
 
 
'''Data:'''
 
 
 
DL = Detour Length (miles)
 
 
 
AADT = Annual Average Daily Traffic
 
 
 
UCI = User Cost Index
 
 
 
'''Formula:'''
 
 
 
:UCI = DL × AADT
 
 
 
Total Points = UCI ÷ 1,000,000 × TPV
 
 
 
===121.5.37 Vehicle Ownership===
 
 
 
The intent of this factor is to be a proxy for needs for other modes of transportation. While vehicle ownership does not always mean there is a need for other modes of transportation, a general correlation can be made. This data is based on 2000 Census data, and is scored on percentage of households WITHOUT a vehicle, compiled by county. The percentages ranged from 3.6 to 25.2%.
 
 
 
'''Data:'''
 
 
 
PW = Percentage of households WITHOUT a vehicle
 
 
 
'''Formula:'''
 
:Total Points = (PW – 4% ) ÷ 4.9% × TPV
 
  
[[image:121.5.38.jpg|center|775px]]
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[[Category:121 Project Planning, Prioritization and STIP Commitments |121.05]]
 
[[Category:121 Project Planning, Prioritization and STIP Commitments |121.05]]

Latest revision as of 11:19, 24 July 2019

MoDOT’s asset management plan is a rolling 10-year strategic framework for making cost-effective decisions about allocating resources and managing road and bridge system infrastructure. It is based on a process of monitoring the physical condition of assets, predicting deterioration over time and providing information on how to invest in order to meet asset management goals.

MoDOT’s Asset Management Plan (AMP) is a crucial element in achieving MoDOT’s strategic goal of keeping roads and bridges in good condition. The AMP ensures MoDOT is using taxpayer money wisely by:

  • Minimizing life cycle costs,
  • Maximizing system performance,
  • Supporting an objective decision making process, and
  • Balancing public expectations with limited funding to create a sustainable plan.

Purpose

MoDOT has adopted a transportation asset management approach to make the best decisions with transportation investments, by allowing decision makers to see how their investment decisions today will affect the system in the future. The purpose of the AMP is to keep roads and bridges in good condition for as long as possible given current funding levels. The plan also clearly demonstrates the investment level needed in order to maintain the system at its current condition and is a transparent way to communicate the funding needs for the system.

Background

MoDOT’s current asset management strategies have been in place since 2005. In 2016, MoDOT’s asset management planning evolved from a statewide plan to individual district models. Since 2016, each of MoDOT’s seven districts maintain an asset management plan for pavements and bridges. These plans have been developed and updated annually by multi-disciplinary teams including bridge, pavement, mobility and maintenance experts along with input from senior leadership, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and regional planning partners.

Goals and Objectives

The department’s asset management plan has been designed to align with MoDOT’s Tangible Results and with Missouri’s Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP). The current and past LRTPs had extensive citizen outreach and consistently produced a number one goal of taking care of the system. Missourians continue to place the highest priorities on structurally sound bridges and smooth roads, as does the AMP. The AMP objective is keep the state’s transportation assets in a good condition over the life cycle of those assets at the most practical cost. Based on current funding constriants, the goal of the AMP is to maintain exisiting pavement and bridge conditions.

121.5.1 Asset Inventory and Condition

Missouri’s state highway system includes over 33,000 centerline miles of roads and more than 10,000 bridges. The system is divided into four roadway categories, each of which has its own unique characteristics regarding size, condition and use:

1) Interstates
2) Major routes
3) Minor routes
4) Low volume routes (fewer than 400 vehicles per day).

121.5.1.1 Pavements

121.5.1.1.1 Pavements Overview

Major routes in Missouri include interstate routes and other major routes and consist of over 5,500 miles and these routes carry the majority of the travel in state. All Major Routes are included in the AMP. For current condition and cost to maintain these routes see Current Asset Management Plan Summary.

121.5.1.1.1 major.jpg
Major Routes

Minor Routes in Missouri consist of over half of the miles on state system and these routes carry approximately one-fourth of the travel in state. All Minor Routes are included in the AMP. For current condition and cost to maintain these routes see Current Asset Management Plan Summary.

121.5.1.1.1 minor.jpg
Minor Routes

Low Volume Routes in Missouri include routes with fewer than 400 vehicles per day travelling on them. Low volume routes consist of approximately 1/3 of the miles on the state system and these routes carry a very small percentage of the travel in state. Low Volume Routes are not included in the AMP and are maintained by MoDOT Maintenance forces. For current condition and cost to maintain these routes see Current Asset Management Plan Summary.

121.5.1.1.1 low.jpg
Low Volume Routes

121.5.1.1.2 Pavement Data Collection and Analysis

121.5.1.1.2 aran.jpg

MoDOT administers a transportation management system (TMS) to store pavement and bridge asset data, which includes a location referencing system, condition data and videos. Pavement data for all state owned routes are collected annually. MoDOT uses an Automatic Road Analyzer (ARAN) vehicle (photo below) to collect the pavement condition data and video of each route. This information is critical to managing MoDOT’s pavement and bridge assets.

TMS applications capture and store all historical pavement data. MoDOT pavement experts then query this historical information and analyze the data using spreadsheets to determine how well the pavement has performed and to establish future pavement deterioration rates for pavement sections.

The pavement planning tool within TMS (as shown below) has the ability to indicate pavement sections that need attention by year. These identified pavement sections are then further analyzed by MoDOT pavement engineers to determine right treatment for the condition. These pavement sections are then considered for programming in the five-year Statewide Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP).

121.5.1.1.2 pavement.jpg

MoDOT has historically analyzed pavement data and tracked progress of pavement by smoothness. Smoothness is measured by international roughness index (IRI), the lower the IRI, the smoother the road. Shown below are the MoDOT rating categories for pavement smoothness:

Pavement Smoothness Condition Categories
Roadway Type IRI Rating Criteria for Good Condition
Interstates & Other Major Routes <100
Minor Routes (>400 vehicles per day) <1401
Low Volume Routes <1702
1 Can be rated good by visual assessment for IRI <170
2 Can be rated good by visual assessment for IRI <220

For current condition and cost to maintain these routes see Current Asset Management Plan Summary.

121.5.1.2 Bridges

121.5.1.2.1.jpg

121.5.1.2.1 Bridges Overview

Missouri has over 10,000 bridges of which over 200 are classified as a Major Bridge (greater than 1,000 feet in length). All state owned bridges are included in the AMP. For current condition and cost to maintain these bridges see Current Asset Management Plan Summary.

121.5.1.2.2 Bridges Data Collection and Analysis

121.5.1.2.2.jpg

All bridges are inspected regularly in accordance with federal law, typically every two years. If a bridge has known problems, it is inspected more frequently. According to the National Bridge Inspection Standards (NBIS), condition ratings are used to describe an existing bridge or culvert compared with its condition if it were new. The ratings are based on the materials, physical condition of the deck (riding surface), the superstructure (supports immediately beneath the driving surface) and the substructures (foundation and supporting posts and piers).

A condition rating is assigned for the bridge’s deck, superstructure and substructure. The lowest rating of the three components is considered the bridge rating.

The rating scale is:

9 – Excellent; 8 – Very Good; 7 – Good; 6 – Satisfactory; 5 – Fair; 3 or 4 – Poor; 2 or less – Closed
NBIS Thresholds for Bridge Condition
9 Good
8
7
6 Fair
5
4 Poor
3

The bridge TMS applications with the bridge NBIS data gathered from field inspections make up the Bridge Management System (BMS). MoDOT has collected and maintained inventory and condition information on National Bridge Inventory (NBI) structures since 1971. An NBI structure is defined as a bridge or culvert that has an opening of at least 20 feet along the centerline of the roadway, is open to the public, and carries vehicular traffic as per 23 CFR 650.

The vast majority of bridges in Missouri are inspected by MoDOT personnel with a small number inspected by consultants or by the local bridge owner. Most are inspected on a two year frequency while a few are done more frequently. MoDOT has worked with FHWA to develop criteria for inspecting some lower risk structures on a 48-month frequency. This is a tool available to MoDOT District Bridge Engineers to help reduce the bridge inspection workload.

Historically, a 50-year service life was anticipated for bridges; however, starting in 2010, structures are anticipated to have a 75-year service life. Major bridges designed since 2000 are anticipated to have a 100-year service life. One of the challenges with managing the bridge assets is the wave of bridges built in the 1950s and 1960s that are all reaching the end of their service life at about the same time.

When programming bridge work, MoDOT takes a multi-pronged approach with varying work types. With the amount of poor bridges in Missouri, several replacements or redecks are needed per year; however, it is more cost effective to spend a portion of the limited funds on keeping Fair bridges Fair and Good bridges Good. This is done through a combination of rehabilitations and preventive maintenance projects. The expected life is 7 to 20 years for bridge rehabilitation.

121.5.2 Asset Management Policy Guidelines

121.5.2.1 MoDOT’s Asset Management Statewide Goals

  • Keep Major Routes in at least 90% good condition. This target goal is reflected in the MoDOT Tracker Measure 2a.
  • Keep Minors Routes (greater than 400 vehicles per day) in at least 80% good condition. This target goal is reflected in the MoDOT Tracker Measure 2a.
  • Keep Low Volume Routes (Minors Routes with fewer than 400 vehicles per day) in at least 70% good condition. This target goal is reflected in the MoDOT Tracker Measure 2a. These routes are not included in the AMP. They are maintained by MoDOT Maintenance forces and the plan for these routes is managed by Central Office Maintenance Division and MoDOT districts.
  • Bridges – maintain the square foot bridge deck in the poor condition from 2016. The square foot of bridge deck in poor condition in 2016 was 4,925,371, which equates to approximately 900 bridges as represented in MoDOT Tracker Measure 2b.
Asset Category Asset Management Statewide Goal
Major Routes – Pavements 90% Good
Minor Routes (>400 vehicles per day) – Pavements 80% Good
Low Volume Routes (<400 vehicles per day) - Pavements 70% Good
Bridges – Poor condition by square feet <4,925,371 square feet
Bridges – Poor condition by number <900 bridges

The district asset management plan should serve as a guide when programming projects into the five-year STIP. For example, the asset management plan might indicate 100 miles of interstate be treated each year, but it does not indicated which 100 miles need treated in that particular year. However, 100 miles should be the target to hit when programming miles to be treated on the interstate in the STIP. The same concept is used for bridges, the asset management plan is a guide to help program the right amount of bridge work to keep the system in good condition.

121.5.2.2 Pavements

  • Overall strategy is to keep good roads in good condition using thin, lower cost preventative maintenance treatments before road conditions worsen and require more costly treatments.
  • Pavement reconstruction will be limited.
  • Shoulder work should be limited and only used as necessary rather than routine.
  • Districts will determine the treatment type, life expectancy and cost/mile for the district specific models and document in their plan how the data was determined.
  • The cost/mile will reflect total project cost/mile not solely pavement cost/lane mile. Total project costs could include items such as: guardrail, grading, coldmilling, mobilization, striping, rumbles, shoulders, traffic control, pavement repair, ADA etc.

121.5.2.3 Bridges

  • Overall strategy is to keep bridges in good condition by maintaining the square foot of bridge deck that is considered poor to the level that was realized in 2016. To accomplish this, MoDOT is using a two-pronged approach. First, fair and good condition bridges must be addressed with preventative maintenance treatments. Second, poor condition bridges will be replaced/redecked.
  • Each district will work with Central Office Bridge Division to establish the replacement/redeck/other (PM/rehab) goals specific to that district and based upon the condition of bridges in that particular district.
  • The cost/sqft will reflect total project cost/sqft not solely bridge cost/sqft. Total project costs could include: roadway pavement costs, mobilization, striping, guardrail, traffic control etc.
  • Major Bridges (1000 feet or longer), are on a planned schedule for replacement/rehab. The Major Bridge Asset Management Plan must be reviewed by the district and if changes need to be made to the cost, type of work and/or year of construction, contact Central Office Bridge Division as they maintain the master file.
  • District Maintenance will continue to perform regular preventative maintenance activities, including bridge flushing and deck sealing.

121.5.2.4 ADA

  • Transition plan must be completed by 2027. Each district outlines the cost to complete the plan and shows how they plan to program the remaining amount.
  • For most districts, it will take more funds than what is received from the Transportation Alternative funds to pay for the rest of the transition plan work.
  • Standalone ADA projects can be accounted for in the Asset Management Plan or ADA can be included in pavement projects.

121.5.2.5 General Programming based on Asset Management

  • Each district’s funding will continue to be based on the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission’s Funding Distribution Policy. All districts distributed funds are accounted for in the Asset Management plans including Safety and Open Container Funds.
  • The concept of practical design still serves as the expectation for project development.
  • The use of core teams is essential in the project development process. Not all improvements desired by the team members make the scope that ultimately gets programmed. The project manager’s responsibility is to develop a project that meets the purpose and need.
  • Scoping and Programming – Having a project fully scoped and designed up to preliminary plans is necessary to set the initial project programming budget. After being programmed, the project budget growth is limited to 3% per year.

121.5.2.6 What Does the Asset Management Plan (AMP) Tell Me?

  • The AMP is based on a 10-year window and it indicates if the district has any funds leftover after taking care of bridges and pavements in the AMP.
  • If a district has any leftover funds, i.e. the district can meet their AMP goals, then system improvement projects can be programmed.
  • If a district does not have any leftover funds i.e. the district cannot meet their AMP goals, then tradeoff discussions must take place within the district and planning partners. Priority will be given to the interstate and major routes (NHS) as the FAST Act emphasizes maintaining these routes.

For current conditions, costs to maintain the system, work types, life cycles etc., see Current Asset Management Plan Summary.

121.5.3 Lifecycle Planning & Preventive Maintenance

Ideally, every mile of pavement and every bridge in the state would be in good condition. Unfortunately, funding is not available to improve and maintain Missouri’s entire transportation system in good condition, so priorities must be established. Significant investments have been made to improve pavement and bridge conditions over the last decade.

121.5.3 satisfaction.jpg

A previous significant investment known as The Smooth Roads Initiative (SRI) improved 2,200 miles of Missouri’s most heavily traveled roads. This program was completed in late 2006 and was mostly comprised of very thin resurfacing treatments to improve the smoothness of the pavement. Missouri’s Major Route system went from approximately 45 percent good pavements to 85 percent good pavements with this initiative and other strategic investments. The goal is to maintain these improved smooth surfaces. As you can see from the chart above, when road smoothness increases on major routes, so does customer satisfaction.

The underlying goal of MoDOT’s asset management plan is to maintain the current condition of pavements and bridges. The most cost effective method to preserve pavements and bridges is to use preventive maintenance treatments while the assets are still in good/fair condition. The chart below shows the basic strategy for MoDOT’s AMP – focused on less expensive preservation treatments more often than expensive rehabilitation and reconstruction treatments less often. The objective is to slow down the rate of deterioration and provide a smooth, durable and safe roadway for users at the lowest cost.

121.5.3 lifecycle.jpg

Lifecycle planning should not be confused with life cycle cost analysis (LCCA). LCCA is performed at the project level and compares specific treatment options against each other, for example, concrete vs. asphalt on a pavement project. Lifecycle planning is performed at the network level where the needs of all roads and structures within that particular network are considered.

121.5.3.1 Pavements

Keeping good roads in good condition is the basic premise of MoDOT’s AMP. The pavement treatment costs for this approach are slightly different for interstates vs. major routes vs. minor routes. Predicting the future costs to keep roadways in good condition involves estimating the type of treatment work needed for each roadway category, when those treatments will be needed and how long those treatments will be effective. The effective life of pavement is most commonly impacted by the traffic volume, preventive maintenance activities, ground support and quality of the materials used in the pavement. For example, interstate routes require a more expensive, heavy-duty pavement to withstand higher traffic volumes and truck traffic.

MoDOT’s approach to pavement preservation is applying a thin, preventive maintenance treatment on a routine cycle. This is the most cost effective way to keep the roads in good condition for the traveling public and preserve the investments made over the last decade. In rare instances, pavements will need a full depth replacement, but properly designed and maintained pavements should only require a preventive maintenance treatment to extend its full life. In addition to the cyclical preventive maintenance treatments, other preventive maintenance treatments such as crack sealing and pavement repairs are performed to further extend the pavements useful life.

For the treatment assumptions, treatment life and average cost for interstate and major routes see Current Asset Management Plan Summary.

121.5.3.2 Bridges

Since Missouri has a large number of poor condition bridges, a preventive maintenance approach alone will not be sufficient to maintain current conditions. A combination of a preventive maintenance approach to prolong the useful life of Missouri’s existing bridges and an aggressive bridge repair/replacement program is needed to maintain current bridge conditions.

121.5.3.2.1 Bridge Preventive Maintenance

MoDOT also performs preventive maintenance activities for bridges. These activities are crucial to providing the lowest lifecycle costs and include:

  • Bridge cleaning and flushing to remove dirt and debris and to allow proper drainage and drying of the deck. The dirt and debris holds moisture and chlorides that cause deterioration. Deck flushing is done in the fall and spring with a thorough cleaning of entire bridge done in the spring following snow season and again in the fall prior to snow season. This cleaning includes the bridge deck, piers, abutments and lower chords of truss bridges. The goal is to flush all bridges each year.
  • Bridge joint and deck sealing is done to prevent dirt, debris and chlorides from deteriorating the deck and supporting bridge members. Sealing activities are performed on a cyclic basis as well as condition basis.
  • Spot painting of bearings and pilings is done to protect from rusting and is performed on an as-needed basis.

121.5.3.2.2 Typical Bridges (shorter than 1000 feet) – Bridge Work Type

MoDOT will do a combination of replacements, redecks, rehabilitation and preventive maintenance treatments to maintain current conditions. Bridge work varies in price per bridge and type of work being performed. For the treatment assumptions, treatment life and average cost for work types see Current Asset Management Plan Summary.

Historically, MoDOT has approached bridge work by the “worst first” method. Asset management has changed the focus from a “worst first” approach to a multi-focused approach including not only full replacements of poor bridges, but also on preventive maintenance of fair condition bridges. The preventive maintenance can be rehabilitation work or traditional type preventive maintenance such as flushing. The focus on preventive maintenance allows MoDOT to keep more bridges in a fair condition much longer.

121.5.3.2.3 Major Bridges (1000 feet or longer) – Bridge Work Type

A major bridge is greater than 1,000 feet in length. The concept of preventive maintenance to maintain current condition is also used on the major bridges in Missouri. Unfortunately, several of the major bridges in Missouri are also well over their useful life and are in need of a full costly replacement. MoDOT currently has over 200 major bridges with approximately 11 percent categorized as poor condition and are in need of replacement, and 63 percent are in the fair condition category.

121.5.4 Funding Assets

The Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission uses a formula to distribute construction program funds for road and bridge improvements to each of its districts. This is the largest area of MoDOT’s budget that provides funding for safety improvements, asset management and system improvement funds that districts can use to take care of the system or invest in major projects that improve safety, relieve congestion and spur economic growth.

121.5.4.pdf
Construction Program Funds Distribution

Once construction program funds are distributed to districts, MoDOT collaborates with regional planning groups to identify local priorities based on projected available funding. The regional transportation improvement plans are brought together to form the department’s STIP, which outlines five years of transportation improvements. As one year of the plan is accomplished, another year is added.

Beginning in Fiscal Year 2022, the Asset Management category allocation amount is based on needs identified in MoDOT’s Asset Management Plan and will be reviewed and updated, if necessary, annually. These amounts will include inflation consistent with MoDOT’s Asset Management Plan. The allocation is distributed as follows:

  • Major Bridges (1000 feet or longer)
  • Asset Management – Remaining asset management total distributed based on formulas that average:
• Percent of total Vehicles Miles Traveled (VMT) on the National Highway System and remaining arterials.
• Percent of square feet of typical state bridge deck (shorter than 1000 feet) on the total state system.
• Percent of total lane miles of National Highway System and remaining arterials.

Beginning in Fiscal Year 2022 and every year thereafter, the remaining funds, System Improvements, must be first used to meet asset management goals, and then remaining funds may be used for other priorities.

Distribution based on the average of:

  • Percent of total population.
  • Percent of total employment.
  • Percent of total VMT on the National Highway System and remaining arterials.

Major Bridges are funded under the Asset Management funding category as shown above. Each year the Major Bridge asset management information found in the 10-year Major Bridge Needs will be reviewed and updated by MoDOT districts and Central Office Bridge Division. If the bridge work falls within the first 3 years of the 5-year STIP, the year and dollar amounts need to be very accurate. The scope of work for Major Bridges needs to be detailed showing all the work items beyond the bridge work such as: adding lanes, expanded shoulder width, lighting, ADA accommodations, aesthetics, etc. All items of work beyond the scope of the bridge itself require the approval of the Chief Engineer to use Major Bridge asset management funds. Roadway tie-ins and traffic control will be considered part of the cost of the bridge and funded from the asset management category, however significant roadway work is not considered part of the Major Bridge and will require the approval of the Chief Engineer to use Major Bridge asset management funds. Any overruns in the project budget for scope considered beyond the Major Bridge work must be funded by the district, all underruns in the project budget will be allocated by the established funding distribution with the exception of funds from other sources that may be allocated by a pro rata share with the approval of the Chief Engineer.

121.5.5 Asset Management Updates

Additional Information
about Bridge Costs
10-Year Major Bridge Needs, 2019

The Asset Management Plan (AMP) is a 10-year rolling plan. Each year every MoDOT district will update the AMP assumptions including: pavement cost per mile, bridge cost per square foot, treatment type, treatment life, number of miles and/or bridges being treated to align with the most current data for the region. The Current Asset Management Plan Summary document is updated yearly to reflect the statewide overall totals and assumptions that are included in the AMP. Below is the rolling timeline associated with producing yearly updates to the AMP.

121.5.5.jpg
Asset Management Rolling Timeline

Central Office Transportation Planning Division houses numerous documents and information for the asset management plan and can be found on the Transportation Planning Division’s Sharepoint site. This information is important when preparing the district’s annual AMP update or to simply refer to in the program delivery process. The documents located on the Sharepoint site are (but not limited to): Instructions to districts for updating their yearly plan, contact information, AMP timeline, historic pavement and bridge data, and each district’s specific asset management plan.